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The GridFS API

The MongoDB Node.js driver now supports a stream-based API for GridFS that’s compatible with Node.js’ streams3, so you can .pipe() directly from file streams to MongoDB. In this tutorial, you’ll see how to use the new GridFS streaming API to upload a CC-licensed 28 MB recording of the overture from Richard Wagner’s opera Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg to MongoDB using streams.

Uploading a File

You can use GridFS to upload a file to MongoDB. This example assumes that you have a file named meistersinger.mp3 in the root directory of your project. You can use whichever file you want, or you can just download a Die Meistersinger Overture mp3.

In order to use the streaming GridFS API, you first need to create a GridFSBucket.

mongodb.MongoClient.connect(uri, function(error, client) {
  assert.ifError(error);

  const db = client.db(dbName);

  var bucket = new mongodb.GridFSBucket(db);

  // Use bucket...
});

The bucket has an openUploadStream() method that creates an upload stream for a given file name. You can pipe a Node.js fs read stream to the upload stream.

const assert = require('assert');
const fs = require('fs');
const mongodb = require('mongodb');

const uri = 'mongodb://localhost:27017';
const dbName = 'test';

mongodb.MongoClient.connect(uri, function(error, client) {
  assert.ifError(error);

  const db = client.db(dbName);

  var bucket = new mongodb.GridFSBucket(db);

  fs.createReadStream('./meistersinger.mp3').
    pipe(bucket.openUploadStream('meistersinger.mp3')).
    on('error', function(error) {
      assert.ifError(error);
    }).
    on('finish', function() {
      console.log('done!');
      process.exit(0);
    });
});

Assuming that your test database was empty, you should see that the above script created 2 collections in your test database: fs.chunks and fs.files. The fs.files collection contains high-level metadata about the files stored in this bucket. For instance, the file you just uploaded has a document that looks like what you see below.

> db.fs.files.findOne()
{
	"_id" : ObjectId("561fc381e81346c82d6397bb"),
	"length" : 27847575,
	"chunkSize" : 261120,
	"uploadDate" : ISODate("2015-10-15T15:17:21.819Z"),
	"md5" : "2459f1cdec4d9af39117c3424326d5e5",
	"filename" : "meistersinger.mp3"
}

The above document indicates that the file is named ‘meistersinger.mp3’, and tells you its size in bytes, when it was uploaded, and the md5 of the contents. There’s also a chunkSize field indicating that the file is broken up into chunks of size 255 kilobytes, which is the default.

> db.fs.chunks.count()
107

Not surprisingly, 27847575261120 is approximately 106.64, so the fs.chunks collection contains 106 chunks with size 255KB and 1 chunk that’s roughly 255KB * 0.64. Each individual chunks document is similar to the document below.

> db.fs.chunks.findOne({}, { data: 0 })
{
	"_id" : ObjectId("561fc381e81346c82d6397bc"),
	"files_id" : ObjectId("561fc381e81346c82d6397bb"),
	"n" : 0
}

The chunk document keeps track of which file it belongs to and its order in the list of chunks. The chunk document also has a data field that contains the raw bytes of the file.

You can configure both the chunk size and the fs prefix for the files and chunks collections at the bucket level. For instance, if you specify the chunkSizeBytes and bucketName options as shown below, you’ll get 27195 chunks in the songs.chunks collection.

const bucket = new mongodb.GridFSBucket(db, {
  chunkSizeBytes: 1024,
  bucketName: 'songs'
});

fs.createReadStream('./meistersinger.mp3').
  pipe(bucket.openUploadStream('meistersinger.mp3')).
  on('error', function(error) {
    assert.ifError(error);
  }).
  on('finish', function() {
    console.log('done!');
    process.exit(0);
  });

Downloading a File

Congratulations, you’ve successfully uploaded a file to MongoDB! However, a file sitting in MongoDB isn’t particularly useful. In order to stream the file to your hard drive, an HTTP response, or to npm modules like speaker, you’re going to need a download stream. The easiest way to get a download stream is the openDownloadStreamByName() method.

const bucket = new mongodb.GridFSBucket(db, {
  chunkSizeBytes: 1024,
  bucketName: 'songs'
});

bucket.openDownloadStreamByName('meistersinger.mp3').
  pipe(fs.createWriteStream('./output.mp3')).
  on('error', function(error) {
    assert.ifError(error);
  }).
  on('finish', function() {
    console.log('done!');
    process.exit(0);
  });

Now, you have an output.mp3 file that’s a copy of the original meistersinger.mp3 file. The download stream also enables you to do some neat tricks. For instance, you can cut off the beginning of the song by specifying a number of bytes to skip. You can cut off the first 41 seconds of the mp3 and skip right to the good part of the song as shown below.

bucket.openDownloadStreamByName('meistersinger.mp3').
  start(1024 * 1585). // <-- skip the first 1585 KB, approximately 41 seconds
  pipe(fs.createWriteStream('./output.mp3')).
  on('error', function(error) {
    assert.ifError(error);
  }).
  on('finish', function() {
    console.log('done!');
    process.exit(0);
  });

An important point to be aware of regarding performance is that the GridFS streaming API can’t load partial chunks. When a download stream needs to pull a chunk from MongoDB, it pulls the entire chunk into memory. The 255 kilobyte default chunk size is usually sufficient, but you can reduce the chunk size to reduce memory overhead.

Moving On

Congratulations, you’ve just used MongoDB and Node.js streams to store and manipulate a .mp3 file. With GridFS, you have a file system with all the horizontal scalability features of MongoDB. It also has a stream-based API you can use to pipe() files to and from MongoDB.